IN SEARCH OF UTOPIA

A holistic movement for a better world
has been evolving throughout history...

Human history has been recorded as a succession of wars and changing empires. But a ray of hope has been carried forth throughout the ages by dreamers who have envisioned a more peaceful, just and sustainable world. The Magna Carta, The US Constitution, and The UN Declaration of Human Rights were significant milestones and quantum leaps forward in our collective quest for a better world. We still have far to go, but we can help create that better world countless dreamers have imagined, wished for, and endeavored to make come true. Every moment has brought us to this moment. We are the ones we've been waiting for to manifest our shared Peacetopian Dream.

 

6th Century BC
"Tao Te Ching"


"If there is to be peace in the world, There must be peace in the nations. If there is to be peace in the nations, There must be peace in the cities. If there is to be peace in the cities, There must be peace between neighbors. If there is to be peace between neighbors, There must be peace in the home. If there is to be peace in the home, There must be peace in the heart." - Lao Tzu

The Tao Te Ching, the principle text of Taoism, one of the major religions of Asia, is said to have been written by 6th Century BC Chinese philosopher Lao Tzu. The basis of Taoism is to live in harmony with the Tao (the 'way' or 'path') which is the root of all things and the driving force behind all of existence. According to the Tao Te Ching, people have free will and can change their nature and behavior. When we return to our natural state of being in harmony with the Tao, we gain power and can solve our own problems and the problems of the world.

 

5th Century BC
"Five Classics"


"When the perfect order prevails, the world is like a home shared by all. Leaders are capable and virtuous. Everyone loves and respects their own parents and children as well as the parents and children of others. The old are cared for, adults have jobs, children are nourished and educated...Everyone has an appropriate role to play in the family and society..." - Confucius

Confucius was a Chinese philosopher and politician whose teachings greatly influenced life throughout many periods of Chinese and other Asian country's history through the Ages. Confucianism, the ethical system developed from his teachings, is based in humanism, with the idea that this world, and in particular family and community, should be the focus of one's spiritual pursuits. Through self-cultivation and shared communal activities, humans can learn to improve and become better people. The most important values in his philosophy are justice, sincerity, personal and governmental morality, and right relationships between all people, which he summed up in an early version of the Golden Rule as "Do not do to others what you do not want done to yourself."

 

c. 380 BC -
"Republic"


Greek philosopher Plato wrote the first known utopian proposal in his most famous work, Republic. Through dialogues and fictional prose, he described how to create an ideal peaceful city-state, where justice reigned and there was no hunger or poverty.

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1215 -
The Magna Carta


The Magna Carta ("Great Charter" in Latin) was one of the first documents in the Western World that proclaimed the rights of the individual, and declared that the King was bound by laws that were fixed and not arbitrary.

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1516 -
"Utopia"


In the early 16th century, Sir Thomas More described an imaginary island called Utopia, whose inhabitants lived in a much more sustainable and egalitarian society than those which existed in Europe at the time. His ideas inspired centuries of Utopian literature, and his work presented concepts in political, religious and social thought that greatly influenced future theorists, philosophers and political organizers.

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1528 -
"On Civil Power"


Francisco de Vitoria was a Jewish-born Spanish Renaissance Roman Catholic legal philosopher, scholar and theologian who is sometimes dubbed 'the father of international law', although the actual concept of international law wasn't developed until many years later. He has also been called the "founder of global political philosophy" because of his description of a 'republic of the whole world.' His lectures, like On Civil Power (De potestate civili) written in 1528, were never published during his lifetime, but his ideas had a profound impact on the paradigm-shifting movements that arose over the next two centuries.

 

1568 -
Edict of Torda (Patent of Toleration)


After the Protestant Reformation in the early 1500s, European countries began establishing national churches, declaring a single religion as the official state religion, and restricting the freedoms of all other faiths. One of the early attempts to guarantee religious freedoms in Europe was the Edict of Torda, or Patent of Toleration, proclaimed in 1568 by King John Sigismund Zápolya (János Zsigmond Zápolya), the King of Hungary and the first ruler of Transylvania. Under the advice of his Unitarian Minister Ferenc Dávid, King Sigismund decided not to establish a state religion in Hungary, but instead promoted religious tolerance.

 

1589 -
"Law of War"


Alberico Gentili was an Italian lawyer and legal scholar living in England who was one of the first to write about the concept of international law. His first work dealing with international law was published in 1582 and his major work on the legal guidelines for war was published in 1589. Although his international fame was eclipsed by the 1625 publication of Dutch legal philosopher Hugo Grotius' book, On The Law of War and Peace, Grotius' work was largely influenced by Gentili. It wasn't until the mid 1800s that Gentili's groundbreaking ideas were rediscovered by international law scholars.

 

1625 -
"On The Law of War and Peace"


Hugo Grotius (Hugo de Groot) was a Dutch legal philosopher, poet and theologian whose 1625 book, On The Law of War and Peace (De Jure Belli ac Pacis) helped lay the foundation for the idea of international law based on the "natural principles of justice." This idea that there are universal and objective standards for justice would later come to be known as 'natural law' and would become the impetus for the Age of Enlightenment and the widespread revolutionary movements for the establishment of democratic governments based on universal rights and the will of the people.

 

1648 -
Peace of Westphalia


War has been a problem that has plagued humanity throughout the ages. One important concept that arose to address the constant fear of having to be vigilantly prepared for war, was for states to form alliances and agreements that would provide 'collective security.' Smaller alliances were common throughout history, but in 1629, French Catholic Cardinal Richelieu proposed a plan for collective security on a much larger scale. His proposal was partially realized in 1648 with the Peace of Westphalia, a series of peace treaties that ended several major ongoing wars.

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1650-1799 -
Age of Enlightenment / Age of Reason


In the 17th and 18th centuries, a movement called the Age of Reason or Age of Enlightenment swept across Europe and the American colonies, changing the existing paradigm by providing a new perspective on the nature of the universe and humanity's place in it. Philosophers, scientists, playwrights and other intellectuals challenged the pervading mindset of the time that was grounded in religious faith and tradition, and instead argued that reason - logical knowledge obtained through a method of scientific inquiry -- should guide one's individual behavior and be the foundation of society's laws and institutions.

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1689 -
"Two Treatises of Government"

John Locke was an English physician and philosopher whose reputation as one of the most influential thinkers of the Enlightenment earned him the distinction of being regarded as the Father of Classical Liberalism. His thoughts on political philosophy influenced many of the proponents of the Age of Enlightenment in Europe as well as the American Revolutionaries, and can be seen in the United States Declaration of Independence and other significant milestone documents. In the second part of his monumental work, Two Treatises of Government, Locke developed his ideas of "natural rights" and the "social contract" as the foundation and justification for his outline of a just and civilized society. Locke proposed that the true 'law of nature' is that all people are born equal, free and independent, and everyone has the natural right to defend their life, liberty, health and possessions.

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1762 -
"The Social Contract"


Jean-Jacques Rousseau's monumental work, Of The Social Contract, Or Principles of Political Right (Du contrat social ou Principes du droit politique) built on ideas of political philosophers like John Locke to more clearly define the ideals of the Enlightenment. Rousseau begins with the assertion that everyone is born free, but in order to exist peacefully, we enter into a 'social contract', whereby each person gives up the same amount of rights and freedoms and takes on the same amount of responsibilities by abiding by a set of laws. The ideals of the Enlightenment inspired the wave of reform and revolution that spread across Europe and the American colonies.

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July 4, 1776 -
United States Declaration of Independence




"We hold these truths to be self-evident,
that all men are created equal,
that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights,
that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness."

The opening of the Preamble to the United States Declaration of Independence has been called "one of the best-known sentences in the English language", and for many historical figures, like Abraham Lincoln and others throughout the world, it represents the moral standard that governments should strive to live up to.

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September 17, 1787-
United States Constitution


Constitutions - a set of basic principles and precedents by which a state, nation or organization are governed - have been used to organize societies throughout history. They describe the structure and laws that determine how a government is organized, and are an agreement between the citizens and the rulers, ensuring that the citizens will have specific rights and responsibilities that the rulers will honor and abide. The United States Constitution, adopted on September 17, 1787 is significant in that it is one of the first to begin with the idea that the government represents the will of the people.

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August 26, 1789 -
Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen


In 18th century French society, the aristocracy had everything, including rights and possessions, but the majority of the population had barely enough to survive. Influenced by the writings of the philosophers of the Enlightenment, many different groups in France, with very different interests, joined together to wage a "revolution of equality." The Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen was the first step in writing a new constitution, and it codified the ideals of the Enlightenment by enumerating the specific natural rights to which all men, who are born free, are entitled.

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September 25 , 1789 -
United States Bill of Rights



While the US Constitution was being drafted, some of the Founding Fathers were concerned that it gave the new federal government too much power. They feared that it posed a threat to the rights and freedom of individuals and surrendered too much of the individual states' authority. Some refused to sign it until it was agreed that a Bill of Rights would be added that would guarantee all men's natural rights to freedom and property, limit the government's judicial power, and ensure the authority of individual states in many matters.

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1793 -
Proposal for a Department of Peace

In 1793, Dr. Benjamin Rush, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence, proposed the creation of a Department of Peace to help establish perpetual peace in the new nation. Although his suggestion was not adopted, the movement to create a department with a Secretary of Peace continued throughout US history. Bills calling for the establishment of a Department of Peace have been introduced in Congress nearly 100 times!

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1795
"Perpetual Peace: A Philosophical Sketch"


In 1795, German Philosopher Immanuel Kant outlined the idea of a 'league of nations' in his monumental work, Perpetual Peace: A Philosophical Sketch. He did not advocate creating a single world government, but instead proposed that all nations should be free, respect their citizens' natural rights, and welcome foreign visitors as equal and fellow rational beings. This would help control conflicts and promote peace between countries, thus creating a peaceful community of nations.

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1814
On the Reorganization of European Society

At the beginning of the Industrial Age in the early 1800s, life was difficult for the working class. Simply to survive, men, women and young children had to work sixteen to eighteen hours a day in terrible conditions. Education opportunities were limited for the poor and diseases were widespread. At the same time, the wealthy class lived a life of leisure and luxury. It was under these conditions that many began to question why these inequalities existed. Several writers, who would later come to be called 'utopian socialists', were instrumental in exploring ideas and arguments that would set the stage for many theoretical and practical applications of political and economic philosophies and experiments. These utopian socialists focused on envisioning and designing ideal models for a better society. Henri de Saint-Simon and Charles Fourier in France, and Robert Owen in Britain were the leading visionaries of this new emerging movement. Saint-Simon, the first of the Utopian Socialists, believed that science should replace religion in guiding society toward a positive reorganization, without exploitation of the individual members of the society. He felt that a true equality could be achieved by "a union of men engaged in useful work." Saint-Simon is often considered the father of 'sociology' - the study of societies, and his many writings, such as his 1814 essay, On the Reorganization of European Society, which predicted the European Union, and several journals which espoused his socialist ideas, greatly influenced the socialist thinkers and pragmatists that followed.

 

 

1815
Peace Societies


The emergence of a paradigm-shifting holistic movement for a more peaceful, just and sustainable world has made great strides thanks to a rich history of organized peace movements. For as long as there have been wars, there have been those who have advocated for peace. But in the last 2 centuries, peace advocates have been more organized and have created major local, national and international movements for peace. Modern peace movements can be traced to the rise of Peace Societies throughout Europe and America. Starting in 1815, the first Peace Societies were created, first in New York, then Ohio and Massachusetts and in London in 1816, each without knowing about the others! Historians trace the impetus for the idea to a tract entitled, "The Mediator's Kingdom, not of this world, but Spiritual," published in 1809 by David Low Dodge, a New York City merchant. Although numerous wars took place during the 1800s and the 20th Century was the bloodiest century in human history, the peace movements continued to grow and sound a voice of reason. It has been the cry for peace that caused the shifts in consciousness that led to the creation of international bodies for global cooperation like the League of Nations and the United Nations, and international laws that help create the parameters and guidelines for behavior for a more a more peaceful, fair, just and equitable world.

 

April 27, 1825
New Harmony


On April 27, 1825, successful British industrialist Robert Owen, established a utopian community in the town of New Harmony, Indiana he had just purchased. This was one of the first intentional communities established to be organized around the principle of rational ethics instead of religion. Owen believed that misery and vice in the world stemmed from a "trinity of evils" : traditional religion, inequalities in wealth and private property, and conventional marriage based on religion and property. He also thought that through education and nurturing a person's intellect and spirit, human character and potential could be developed to its highest potential and benefit for the individual and the community. 800 people were invited to live for free in his egalitarian, utopian experiment. Although the community proved to be an economic failure after just two years, Owen's experiment provided inspiration for many philosophers and political pragmatists and in the development of what would eventually become the principles and practices of socialism.

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1836
New Moral World


After Robert Owen established a successful cooperative cotton factory in Scotland in the early 1800s proving that a business venture could be financially successful and humane to its workers, and launched his experimental utopian community in New Harmony, Indiana from 1825-1827, he returned to Britain and continued promoting his 'New Moral World' utopian ideas for a more egalitarian society. Owen was one of the first to use the word 'socialism' to describe the philosophy of mutually-owned and operated working and living communities he was promoting. He and his followers set up gathering places called 'Halls of Science' for non-religious meetings and lectures, where participants communed and sang 'socialist' hymns together. Many early socialist writers and thinkers contributed to a weekly periodical called New Moral World that Owen published. One of the contributors and members of Owen's gatherings was a young German journalist named Friedrich Engels, who would later collaborate with Karl Marx to lay the foundation for one of the world's major political and economic systems. In 1836, Robert Owen outlined his ideas in The Book of The New Moral World "containing the rational system of society, founded on demonstrable facts, developing the constitution and laws of human nature and of society."

 

 

1843
International Peace Congress


Today social media has made the possibility of organizing for true paradigm-shifting transformation for a better world more possible than ever. One of the most powerful previous vehicles for change was the advent of global forums that brought activists together for a shared mission from distant places around the world. In 1843, the International Peace Congress was a milestone event in the rise of global forums. At the suggestion of British Quaker, abolitionist and worker's rights activist Joseph Sturge, a series of international meetings of representatives from peace societies throughout the world took place in various locations throughout Europe, starting in London in 1843. By sharing their experiences of successes and failures and coordinating their activities, the global peace movement and the individual peace societies themselves were able to be more efficient and effective in their work.

 

1849
"Civil Disobedience"


Henry David Thoreau was one of the first to define and use 'civil disobedience' as a means of nonviolent protest. His essay, Civil Disobedience, was published in 1849, and the ideas he expressed have had a profound influence on nearly every nonviolent movement for change since. Gandhi credited Thoreau in helping inspire the ideas and tactics he utilized in the movement of nonviolent resistance that he led to win independence for India in 1947. Martin Luther King, Jr. read Thoreau's essay at college and "became convinced then that non-cooperation with evil is as much a moral obligation as cooperation with good." By building on Thoreau's ideas, Gandhi and King showed that civil disobedience was an effective tool to raise awareness and bring about change. Today many diverse movements for a better world continue to use the language and techniques of nonviolent direct action that Thoreau wrote about.

 

February 1, 1865
13th Amendment Abolishing Slavery


The acceptance of the concept of slavery - the idea of one person 'owning' another - is one of the most obvious hurdles that had to be overcome in the pursuit of creating a better world. Unbelievably, slavery was only outlawed in the United States a century and a half ago, and the journey towards the abolition of slavery was a slow and difficult victory fought by many over many years. In the late 18th century the call for an end to slavery became very widespread, although colonies and new nations that arose, like America, where slavery was established, continued to use slaves. In 1833, Britain abolished slavery throughout the British Empire; France did the same in 1848; and the 13th Amendment to the US Constitution abolished slavery in the United States in 1865 after a bloody civil war that was somewhat fought over this issue. Fortunately, human consciousness has evolved so that slavery is almost universally seen as a grave injustice, and it is illegal almost everywhere on earth. However, we still have more to do to banish this violation of freedom, because slavery still exists today in the form of human trafficking for labor and sexual bondage.

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1879
"Progress and Poverty"


The equal right of all men to the use of land is as clear as their equal right to breathe the air — it is a right proclaimed by the fact of their existence. For we cannot suppose that some men have a right to be in this world, and others no right.” - Henry George

Today there is growing interest in the "global commons movement" which directly challenges the current trend toward privatization of social services and community resources. Instead it presents the idea that resources that people need to survive, like air, water and land, and the infrastructure that allows society to function, should be shared by all. Many also feel that the commons should include our shared cultural heritage - sites of historical significance as well as art, music and literature. The idea of seeing our shared assets as part of the commons is certainly not new, and a number of historical movements around this idea have arisen throughout history. Nineteenth-century political economist Henry George was a popular writer and speaker who inspired an economic philosophy called Georgism, rooted in the idea that all people who live in a country collectively own the land of that country. He was a strong believer in private ownership, but only of things that people create. Citizens should be allowed to have 'private occupancy' of land, but they would only be renting the land from the community to use. In his most famous work, Progress and Poverty, Henry George discussed the inequality inherent in the pervading economic system, and detailed the economic principles in his idea of a "single tax" on land that would do away with all other taxes, and keep ownership of land in the hands of the community for future generations.

 

 

May 18, 1899 -
Hague Peace Conference


In 19th century Europe, nationalistic tensions, combined with economic inequalities brought about by the Industrial Revolution, and military advancements like the invention of dynamite and more efficient killing machines capable of causing more horrific and widespread destruction, set the stage for a war mentality that led to a growing arms race between nations. In 1899, Russian Tsar Nicholas II invited the leaders of Europe to meet in The Netherlands at The Hague to discuss disarmament, international laws that would help to limit wars between nations, and the establishment of an international court to settle disputes peacefully.

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1901 -
Nobel Peace Prize


For over a century, the Nobel Peace Prize has been thought of as the highest honor that can be bestowed upon a person who has dedicated their life to creating a more peaceful, just and sustainable world. Ironically, the Prize and the large cash award that comes with it, were made possible because of Alfred Nobel's invention of the deadly explosives, dynamite and ballistite in the mid-1800s.

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1906-1914
"Satyagraha"


Mohandas Gandhi is an iconic figure revered for profoundly proving that nonviolent action is a powerful force for change. While working as a lawyer in South Africa, Gandhi became politically involved in defending the rights of the oppressed Indian minority population living and working there. Influenced by the idea of 'natural rights' described by the writers of the Enlightenment, Henry David Thoreau's ideas of 'civil disobedience' and the idea of 'passive resistance' urged by others before him, Gandhi coined the term 'satyagraha' to describe the type of nonviolent resistance he developed as he organized massive strikes, protests and other forms of nonviolent noncooperation. Using the practice of satyagraha, Gandhi helped India gain its independence from British rule. Gandhi's actions and teachings greatly influenced many other nonviolent struggles for a better world, including Martin Luther King, Jr.'s campaigns for civil rights, Nelson Mandela's struggle under apartheid in South Africa, and Cesar Chavez's advocacy for worker's rights.

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January 8, 1918 -
Fourteen Points


The United States was very hesitant to get involved when war broke out in Europe in 1914, but after the Germans sank 7 US merchant ships, the US entered World War I in 1917. On January 8, 1918, President Woodrow Wilson delivered a speech to a joint session of Congress called the "Fourteen Points." The speech laid out a policy of the benefits and responsibilities that all signers of a peace agreement would share. Wilson's Fourteen Points was largely the basis for Germany's call for an armistice and peace negotiations in October, 1918. President Wilson received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1919, and although the United States Congress would not allow the US to join, the League of Nations that President Wilson described in the "Fourteen Points" was created that year.

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June 28, 1919 -
League of Nations


The League of Nations was the first international organization that was created for the purpose of promoting world peace. It was formed after the end of World War I during the Paris Peace Conference, with a wide-ranging set of goals, including settling international disagreements through arbitration and negotiation; preventing wars through disarmament and collective security; promoting health and humanitarian relief; and abolishing slave labor and illegal drug trafficking.

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1920 -
19th Amendment - Women's Right to Vote


Even though they make up half the population, women and girls have endured discrimination in most societies for thousands of years. In the past, women were largely treated as property of their husbands or fathers - they couldn't own land, they couldn't vote or go to school, and were subject to beatings and abuse. Over the last hundred years, much progress has been made to gain equal rights for women around the world, but many still live without the rights to which all people are entitled. Gaining the right to vote and hold a public office was a major milestone in the struggle for women's rights. The women's suffrage movement, which secured these rights for women, can be traced to France in the 1780s. The French Revolution was inspired by the writers of the Enlightenment who spoke about the equality and natural rights of all people -- men and women. Although the French constitution that was adopted did not grant women equal rights, during the Revolution women worked hand-in-hand with men with an expectation of this ideal goal in mind. Over the next 130 years, movements arose all around the world gaining limited victories, and finally with the passage of the 19th Amendment, women were granted the right to vote in the United States in 1920.

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1933 -
The New Deal


In a utopian world, everyone would have all they need for life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness, and at least the chance to achieve their hearts’ desires. In October, 1929, the Wall Street Stock Market crashed, plunging the United States into the worst economic Depression in history. The widespread devastation and suffering this caused, illustrated the failure and lack of utopian mission in the dominant institutions of the day; clearly the governmental infrastructure and the economic institutions had not been acting in the best interests of the majority of the people. The nation was in desperate need of change, and it came through the economic policies of Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s “New Deal.”

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April 15 , 1935 -
The Roerich Pact - Pax Cultura


Russian painter and philosopher Nicholas Roerich designed the 'pax cultura' ('cultural peace' or 'peace through culture') symbol to express his belief that humanity's future depended on preserving our cultural heritage, and promoting universal culture and spiritual development of all people. He was successful in bringing together the governments of North, South and Central America to agree to the protection of cultural objects in times of war and peace, with the signing of the Roerich Pact on Protection of Artistic and Scientific Institutions and Historic Monuments at the White House in Washington DC on April 15, 1935. Roerich based his symbol on sacred origins, with the three circles within a circle representing 'art' 'science' and 'religion' as the expressions of human culture, as well as the concept of the past, present and future within the eternity of time.

 

 

August 14, 1935 -
Social Security Act


The writers of The Enlightenment explored the idea of a "social contract" between society and the individual. If an individual agrees to abide by the laws the society imposes which restrict a person's natural rights of freedom, then society is morally obligated to ensure that all members of the society have all that they need to live and at least the chance to pursue a good life for themselves. After the greed of the wealthy created the Great Depression and caused widespread hunger, poverty and suffering for much of America, many felt that the government should do more to create a safety net so that no citizens should be subjected to these injustices. As part of the New Deal, President Franklin D. Roosevelt's administration set up many social programs to assist people in all walks of life. Populations most hurt by a troubled economy were the elderly, disabled, and widows with children, who did not necessarily have a steady income to provide for their family's needs. On August 14, 1935, President Roosevelt signed the Social Security Act, a program that is funded by a payroll tax on workers and their employers, and continues to this day to provide benefits to retirees, the disabled, and to the family's of deceased workers who have paid into the system.

 

1938 -
Fair Labor Standards Act


A nation's well-being depends on those who work to provide the goods and services that allow its citizens to lead productive and healthy lives. Often throughout history, societies have been divided into different classes, with one class typically having to do much of the work that keeps that society running. Employers and governments have not always treated the working classes well - often workers had to work long hours, in hazardous conditions for little pay. The labor movement arose in Europe during the Industrial Revolution in the 18th and early 19th centuries, beginning with working people organizing into groups called labor unions and trade unions. With strength in numbers, workers had a better chance to convince employers and governments to treat them more fairly. The movement met with great resistance from the privileged classes. But by the late 1800s it began to grow into a worldwide movement, advocating for reforms for the working class, eventually leading to the elimination of child labor, the right for workers to organize into unions, to have shorter work days and livable wages. A major milestone was the 1938 passage of the Fair Labor Standards Act as part of the Roosevelt Administration's New Deal policies. The Act established a national minimum wage and 40 hour work week, time and a half for overtime, and prohibited oppressive child labor.

 

 

January 6 , 1941 -
The Four Freedoms


The State of the Union address that President Franklin Delano Roosevelt delivered before the US Congress on January 6, 1941 is famously remembered as the Four Freedoms speech. In this speech, President Roosevelt outlined four basic freedoms that everyone in the world should enjoy: freedom of speech; freedom of worship; freedom from want; and freedom from fear.

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October 24, 1945 -
The United Nations


For more than 65 years since its founding, the United Nations has shone as humanity's greatest hope for a more peaceful, just and sustainable world. It has helped to promote human rights, freedom and democracy, erase poverty and hunger, improve health and education, and urge the governments of the world to work together in peace. However, the UN can only do what governments allow it to do. Across the globe, a people's movement has been growing to convince governments to help the UN in its goals, to reform the UN by making it more democratic, and to allow the UN to work more closely with civil society in solving the planet's problems.

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August, 1947
World Federalist Movement
 

The world has become an interconnected community with a growing number of global problems. Because the United Nations does not have the authority to enforce many international laws and treaties, and is not a democratically elected body (and thus does not always represent the will of all global citizens), some believe the world needs a more formalized form of democratic global governance. World federalists advocate for the creation of a democratically elected world government with the authority to make and enforce international laws. In 1947, 51 world federalist organizations from around the world came together to unite their efforts.

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December 10, 1948 -
Universal Declaration of Human Rights


After the horror of widespread, devastation, suffering and genocide that ravaged the world during World War II, there was a general consensus that something had to be done to make sure this kind of gross violation of human rights never took place again. Protecting basic rights is essential in creating a world at peace, and it was one of the foundations of the goals of the United Nations when it was created in 1945. The UN Charter requires nations to respect basic rights and freedoms and to take action to protect them. To make it clear to nations what 'fundamental freedoms' and 'human rights' all people of the earth should be guaranteed, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on December 10, 1948. The UDHR is now the most translated document in the world, and it continues to provide the moral and diplomatic framework for those working for human rights to bring about the changes needed to create a better world.

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1955-
"Let There Be Peace On Earth"


Husband and wife song-writing team, Jill Jackson and Sy Miller, first introduced their song, Let There Be Peace On Earth at a retreat with a group of multicultural high school students. Sy Miller described the occasion and the profound effect it has had on millions around the world since then: "'Let There Be Peace on Earth, and Let It Begin With Me' first born on a mountain top in the voices of youth, continues to travel heart to heart – gathering in people everywhere who wish to become a note in a song of understanding and peace—peace for all mankind."

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1955
May Peace Prevail On Earth


After living through the horrors of World War II, Masahisa Goi dedicated his life to promoting peace. In Japan in 1955, he began a worldwide Movement of Prayer for World Peace based on promoting the universal prayer of peace, "May Peace Prevail On Earth." He founded The Byakko Shinko Kai, an association based on his spiritual teachings, and The World Peace Prayer Society which continues to promote the message, "May Peace Prevail On Earth," in every language. Today this shared wish for a more peaceful, just and sustainable world can be found on nearly 200,000 peace poles in 180 countries.

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July 9, 1955
"The Russell-Einstein Manifesto"


In the midst of the Cold War, eleven prominent scientists and intellectuals issued a statement, called the Russell-Einstein Manifesto, that warned governments about the dangers of nuclear proliferation and called for world leaders to work together to find peaceful solutions to international conflicts and disputes. The signatories included ten Nobel Prize winners, including economist and philosopher Bertrand Russell who led the initiative, and world-renown scientist Albert Einstein, who signed it only days before he died. Shortly after the statement was issued, a philanthropist agreed to fund an international conference, which the Manifesto had suggested should take place for scientists to assess the urgent new dangers of the nuclear age. This would turn out to be the first of the Pugwash Conferences on Science and World Affairs, and the organization of the same name that was formed went on to win the Nobel Peace Prize in 1995 for its continuing work for nuclear disarmament.

 

 

1956
The Beloved Community


One of the goals that Martin Luther King, Jr. promoted was the creation of the 'Beloved Community'. Dr. King envisioned a global community of brotherhood and sisterhood, where all are included and treat each other without bigotry, discrimination or racism. All people will be seen as equals, and will share in the abundance of the earth, so that there will be no hunger, poverty or homelessness. Everyone will be educated with the tools and resources to work out personal conflicts through peaceful conflict resolution, and nations will resolve international disputes through the same nonviolent means, instead of engaging in military conflicts. Today, Dr. King's concept of 'the beloved community' is embraced at the very heart of many organizations, including The King Center, as well as by many diverse faith-based groups and churches.

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1960 - 1963
The New Frontier


"…we stand today on the edge of a New Frontier … the frontier of unknown opportunities and perils, the frontier of unfilled hopes and unfilled dreams. ... Beyond that frontier are uncharted areas of science and space, unsolved problems of peace and war, unconquered problems of ignorance and prejudice, unanswered questions of poverty and surplus…" - John F. Kennedy, 1960 Democratic National Convention acceptance speech

When John F. Kennedy accepted his party's nomination as the Democratic Presidential Candidate, he delivered a speech that coined the expression, "New Frontier" to describe the paradigm-changing actions he would pursue to create a more peaceful, just and sustainable world, if he were elected. This hopeful slogan became the banner for his administration's domestic and foreign policies and programs which aimed to eradicate poverty, strengthen the nation's infrastructure and reduce pollution, promote disarmament and create a more peaceful and cooperative global community, and accelerate the space program to send a man to the moon by the end of the decade. Under the New Frontier, many major social and economic reforms and achievements were made. In fact, during the Kennedy Administration, more new bills were passed by Congress than at any other time since the early 1930s.

 

March 1, 1961
United States Peace Corps


Much of the efforts to make life better for our communities and our world are done by volunteers. Around the world, hundreds of millions of people volunteer - nearly 65 million volunteer in America! Many volunteer organizations are run through private and public nonprofit organizations, and some are coordinated through state and national governments. Through service to others in different cultures, volunteers in the United States Peace Corps provide hands-on expertise to assist in social and economic development, help others to understand American culture, and learn about the cultures of other countries themselves. President Kennedy issued an Executive Order establishing the Peace Corps on March 1, 1961, and since then more than 210,000 American Peace Corps volunteers have served in 139 countries "to promote world peace and friendship."

More

 

August 28, 1963
"I Have A Dream"


Martin Luther King, Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech has become a much-referenced and beloved symbol of countless efforts for a more peaceful, just and sustainable world. Dr. King often spoke of 'dreams' in his speeches, usually referring to the gap between the ideals of the 'American Dream' and the reality that most people, especially people of color, faced. On August 28, 1963, his "I Have a Dream" speech was the centerpiece of the "March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom" that brought more than 250,000 civil rights supporters to the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington DC. Coinciding with the 100 year anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation that abolished slavery, Dr. King inspired the crowd and countless future generations with his vision of fulfilling the American Dream to truly create a land of freedom and equality. This defining moment of the Civil Rights Movement clearly demonstrated the effective power of amassing large numbers of supporters for a cause of social significance. The March helped put pressure on Congress and the Kennedy Administration to adopt important civil rights legislation, and has and will continue to inspire and empower numerous marches and protests for other social causes.

 

1963 - 1969
The Great Society


"And with your courage and with your compassion and your desire, we will build the Great Society." - President Lyndon Johnson on May 7, 1964 at Ohio University

Lyndon B. Johnson became President after the assassination of John F. Kennedy, and when the Democrats won major landslide victories in Congress in the 1964 election, President Johnson found himself with the most liberal House of Representatives since the 1930s. He recognized the opportunity to revive some of the liberal proposals his predecessor had not been able to convince Congress to pass, as well as to launch even more ambitious plans to address some of the major issues that faced the nation in order to create a truly 'great society'. Under the banner of "The Great Society", President Johnson successfully promoted sweeping domestic policy legislation that focused on arts and culture, civil rights, consumer protection, education, the environment, medical care, poverty and transportation. The next two Republican Presidents, Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford, continued to expand many of the programs begun under the Great Society agenda.

 

July 2, 1964
Civil Rights Act of 1964


"Civil Rights" are the rights and privileges to which we are entitled under the laws that govern our nation. In America, our civil rights are guaranteed in the Constitution, particularly in the Bill of Rights and other Amendments. Even though the Emancipation Proclamation freed the slaves in 1865 and the 13th Amendment outlawed slavery and guaranteed African Americans the rights to which all American citizens are entitled, many African Americans in the South were not allowed to exercise their civil rights, even until the 1960s. The Civil Rights Movement in the United States helped to win equality for all Americans. The Civil Rights Act of 1964 was a major milestone victory in the Civil Rights Movement. Signed into law by President Lyndon Johnson on July 2, 1964, this monumental legislation prohibited discrimination against women and ethnic, national, racial and religious minorities. It outlawed segregation in public facilities, schools and workplaces, and demanded that voter registration procedures and rules apply equally to all citizens regardless of race.

 

1966
Grape Boycott


Starting in 1966, Cesar Chavez, and the United Farmer Workers labor union (UFW) he helped found, began organizing a series of boycotts to protest for higher wages and safer working conditions for farm workers. In the first effort, the UFW urged all Americans not to buy grapes to show their support for the workers. This boycott lasted six years and captured national attention. Similar boycotts and strikes took place throughout the 60s and 70s, leading to legislation that guaranteed higher wages, the banning of toxic pesticides and other safety issues for workers. These efforts clearly demonstrated the effective potential power for social transformation that can be achieved by creating movements that engage average citizens to join in specific actions for a social cause.

 

 

1968
"Operating Manual for Spaceship Earth "


“You never change things by fighting the existing reality. To change something, build a new model that makes the existing model obsolete.” - R. Buckminster Fuller

R. Buckminster Fuller was an architect and utopian futurist who challenged the status quo of continuing on a path that he saw was leading to the destruction of our planet. Instead, Bucky Fuller created revolutionary new models in architectural design and ways of thinking to create an alternate paradigm for a positive future for humanity. An early environmental activist and pioneer in the concept of thinking globally, he popularized the term "Spaceship Earth" to express concern about the limited resources on our planet, and the need for the global community to work together for the benefit of all. Bucky Fuller wrote more than 30 books, including Operating Manual for Spaceship Earth in 1968 and Utopia or Oblivion in 1969, and is known for numerous inventions and designs like the geodesic dome, which have inspired countless others to re-imagine new ways to make the world a better place. To truly change the existing paradigm, Buckminster Fuller strongly believed that the global economy should be transformed so that true wealth would be measured by the "technological ability to protect, nurture, support, and accommodate all growth needs of life."

 

1970 -
EARTH DAY


The environmental movement is one of the most successful social change movements. Popularizing Earth Day celebrations can be credited with bringing the movement to the mainstream. Through grassroots efforts, festivals, fairs, assemblies and concerts have helped popularize concern for our environment in the public's mind. Since so many people participate in Earth Day activities, Earth Day is the perfect opportunity to get people to tap-into the better world movement, so that they can find the inspiration and encouragement to continue activities for a more peaceful, just and sustainable world all year long. When is Earth Day? Actually, there are 3 Earth Days - 3 dates that are dedicated to helping raise awareness about the health and well being of the land, skies and water of our planet Earth. The original Earth Day is celebrated on the Spring Equinox each year. April 22 is the date that most people know as Earth Day. Both of these Earth Days were first celebrated in 1970 - on March 21 and April 22. In 1972, the United Nations designated June 5 as World Environment Day to commemorate the opening of the Conference on the Human Environment in Stockholm that year, which ultimately led to the creation of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the main UN body devoted to protecting our environment.

EarthSite.org
EarthDay.org

 

October 11, 1971-
"Imagine"


For many people, John Lennon's song Imagine is the perfect anthem for the shared utopian vision a more peaceful, just and sustainable world. The best-selling single of his career asks us to imagine a world where we live life to the fullest, unattached to material possessions and without the barriers and divisiveness of borders, nationalities and religions. Lennon's wife Yoko Ono said that the song summed up "just what John believed: that we are all one country, one world, one people." Rolling Stone ranked "Imagine" number 3 on its list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time," and stated that "It is now impossible to imagine a world without 'Imagine', and we need it more than he ever dreamed." The song is universal and is beloved all around the world -- Former US President and humanitarian Jimmy Carter said, "in many countries around the world - my wife and I have visited about 125 countries - you hear John Lennon's song 'Imagine' used almost equally with national anthems."

 

1981 -
The International Day of Peace


The International Day of Peace was established by the United Nations in 1981 as a worldwide day of peace, and since its inception it has inspired millions to find ways to promote hope for a more peaceful, just and sustainable world.

In 2001, a new UN Resolution changed the date for the observance of the International Day of Peace to September 21. Until then, it had been tied to the opening of the General Assembly of the United Nations. This was the day when the governments of the world began their work together for the new year, and starting with a day dedicated to peace was a powerful symbol of shared intention. But some felt that since the General Assembly did not begin on a fixed date each year, it made it difficult for it to become a mainstreamed day of celebration around the world. The New Resolution also included stronger language calling upon nations, organizations and individuals to observe the day as a global ceasefire, in addition to celebrating it as a day of peace.

InternationalDayOfPeace.org

 

 

1981
Ashoka: Innovators for the Public


“The core psychology of a social entrepreneur is someone who cannot come to rest, in a very deep sense, until he or she has changed the pattern in an area of social concern all across society.” - Bill Drayton

In a better world, everyone would be able to earn their livelihood at jobs that help to make the world a better place. Many people today are finding ways to work for a better world and make a living at the same time. A social entrepreneur is someone who sees a social problem and creates a new and innovative way to address it. While some social entrepreneurs work through nonprofits, citizen groups or government programs, many create sustainable businesses to address the problem. Typical businesses measure their success by the amount of profit they make; social entrepreneurs measure their success by how big an impact they make in bringing about social change.

The term 'social entrepreneur' is fairly new - it was first used in the 1960s and 1970s. But social entrepreneurs can be found all throughout history and include many historical figures, like Florence Nightingale who established the first nursing school. The modern social entrepreneur movement began in 1981 when social entrepreneurial pioneer Bill Drayton founded Ashoka: Innovators for the Public to identify and support social entrepreneurs. To date, Ashoka has supported more than 1800 social entrepreneurs in over 60 countries. Now there are quite a number of organizations that promote social entrepreneurship as an important way to address today's social problems.

(more)

 

1982
Newman's Own: All Profits to Charity


Paul Newman is best known as an Academy-award winning movie star, featured in more than 50 movies, but he was also a professional racing car driver and trailblazing philanthropist. In 1982, Paul Newman co-founded Newman's Own, a for profit food company that donates all of its after-tax profits to charity; so far Newman's Own has donated more than $300 million! This new idea of providing goods and services as a way to raise money for charities, instead of simply asking for donations, is a revolutionary approach to funding philanthropic efforts, and has inspired many other social entrepreneurial ventures.

 

 

1985 -
77 THESES ON THE CARE OF THE EARTH

John McConnell, the founder of the original Earth Day, created many significant projects and campaigns for a more peaceful, just and sustainable world including a 1957 Star of Hope proposal, calling for peaceful international cooperation for space exploration; Meals For Millions to feed refugees in 1962, and the Minute For Peace campaign to bring the world together in a moment of silence for peace in 1963. He wrote several blueprints for a better world, including an original Earth Charter document in 1979, and a comprehensive plan for a better world entitled, 77 Theses On the Care of the Earth: A Guide for Earth Trustees - Principles and Policies that will foster the peaceful nurture and care of the planet Earth in 1985.

(more)

 

1988 -
Global Cooperation for a Better World
/ Visions of a Better World


The Global Cooperation project was a Peace Messenger collaboration between the United Nations and the NGO, Brahma Kumaris World Spiritual University, in which hundreds of thousands of people in more than 120 countries were asked to share in words or pictures their response to the question "What is your vision of a Better World?" The ideas and actions offered were compiled and a Global Vision Statement was created, based on the common visions shared.

(More)

 

1991 -
Earth Constitution

The World Constitution and Parliament Association is a worldwide association of citizens, chapters, and affiliated organizations that was launched in 1958 with the purpose of creating an enforceable democratic world government constitution. In 1991, after 33 years of consultations and constituent assemblies, an Earth Constitution was drafted that would establish a democratic nonmilitary global government with enforceable environmental and human rights laws. Since then, the Earth Federation Movement (EFM) -- the global movement to raise awareness and support for this constitution -- continues to advocate for a democratic federation of nations and peoples under the Earth Constitution.

Earth Constitution
Earth Federation Movement

 

June 3-14, 1992 -
The Earth Summit

The formation of the United Nations created a vehicle for the governments of the world to work together to address the shared problems of the global community. For the most serious issues, major global conferences are held, where leaders, national experts and civil society activists participate with the intent of agreeing on a course of action to address the issue. Often the NGO (non-governmental organizations) community will hold a mirror-event at the same time to ensure that civil society's voice is heard as well as governmental interests. Follow-up forums are often held five, ten and twenty years later to gauge progress and re-ignite mainstream awareness and action on the issue. This powerful paradigm-shifting trend was largely launched at The Earth Summit (officially the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development) in Rio de Janeiro from June 3-14, 1992. 172 governments and 2400 NGO representatives participated, and 17,000 more global citizens attended a parallel NGO Forum. Numerous critical environmental issues were brought to attention, including global climate change, alternative energy, the growing scarcity of water, sustainable development and biodiversity.

 

1992 -
UNESCO Culture of Peace Programme

A Culture of Peace is a paradigm shift in which individuals, organizations, neighborhoods and nations join together as a global community in a common goal: to work towards creating a more peaceful, just and sustainable world. Our current culture is driven by the global economy and it affects our everyday lives, and our outlook about the world and our future. The aim of the global movement that has arisen to promote a culture of peace, is to transform our focus from the global economy to the care and well-being of our interconnected global community. The Global Movement For a Culture of Peace arose out of the UNESCO Culture of Peace Programme which was adopted by UNESCO in 1992, and sought to create national culture of peace programs that could be implemented in UN member countries.  In 1999, the United Nations General Assembly adopted a resolution, entitled the Declaration and Programme of Action on a Culture of Peace that called for a global movement for the culture of peace, inviting member states, civil society organizations and individuals in all walks of life to join in partnership with the United Nations.

(More)

 

1992 -
World Peace Plan
4000 IDEAS & DREAMS FOR A BETTER WORLD


Robert Muller was called many things during his life, such as the "Prophet of Hope" and "Philosopher of the United Nations" for his many years at the UN; the "Father of Global Education" because of his "World Core Curriculum" that is used in dozens of Robert Muller Schools around the world and earned him the UNESCO Peace Education Prize in 1989; and "One of greatest visionaries you've never heard of." Dr. Muller began working at the United Nations shortly after it was created and served as Assistant-Secretary General under three United Nations Secretary Generals. Behind the scenes he helped popularize the idea of observing international days, years and decades to unite the world in celebration and action for a particular social issue; the observance of the International Day of Peace beginning in 1981, for example, was largely due to his efforts working with the NGO, Pathways To Peace. Robert Muller co-founded the UN's University For Peace in Costa Rica and was nominated 22 times for the Nobel Peace Prize. His life and all of his 20 books were devoted to helping create a more peaceful, just and sustainable world.

In 1992, Robert Muller drafted the steps for a Peace Plan to achieve world peace by 2010 which was based on his 1991 novel, First Lady of the World, in which he serves as advisor to the first woman Secretary General of the United Nations and helps her create world peace. In 1995 he completed the first 500 of his 4000 Ideas and Dreams for a Better World. This monumental work continues to inspire countless 'dreamers' to believe that together we can create a better world.

RobertMuller.org

 

1995 - "When Corporations Rule The World"

David Korten's 1995 book, When Corporations Rule the World helped to spur the anti-globalization movement by presenting a clear and concrete case against the global consolidation of corporate power, market deregulation, privatization and the overriding emphasis on consumerism, while convincingly outlining an alternative path of 'people-centered development' by increasing local, national and global control over international corporations and finance to encourage corporate social and environmental responsibility, and creating local economies that utilize local resources rather than expanding international trade.

 

1996 - "The Peace On Earth Millennium"

In his 1996 book, The Peace On Earth Millennium and 2003 follow-up, We Want Peace On Earth!, utopian author Robert Alan Silverstein makes the case that many diverse movements for a more peaceful, just and sustainable world have been evolving and converging into an emerging, as yet unnamed holistic movement. He called it the Peace On Earth Movement, because although it can be traced back through many different social-movement paths, the goal of each shares a vision of a world at peace, balance and harmony that can best be described as peace on earth. Once we recognize that so many things are already being done by so many people to help create this shared vision, we will be inspired and empowered to make striving towards peace on earth our personal and societal goal.

 

September 18, 1997
Mine Ban Treaty


The International Campaign to Ban Landmines (ICBL) is one of the great success stories of grassroots organizing that proves Margaret Mead's famous quotation: "Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has." In 1992 several Non Governmental Organizations that were concerned about the 100 million buried landmines on roads and footpaths in more than 60 countries which kill or maim an innocent civilian every 22 seconds, decided to work together on a global campaign to ban these deadly weapons. Human rights activist, Jody Williams headed the campaign, and grew the network to more than 1300 active organizations in 95 countries, all before the popularity of the Internet and the advent of other social media tools we have available today. The campaign brought the issue to mainstream attention and resulted in the drafting of the Mine Ban Treaty on September 18, 1997. To date, more than 160 nations have ratified the UN treaty, but 36 countries, including the United States, Russia and China have yet to do so. Jody Williams and the ICBL received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1997 for their lifesaving work. Although landmines continue to kill and cripple innocent people, the Treaty has given organizations and governments a valuable tool in ending the use of landmines, and the campaign has inspired countless other activist-networks in their efforts to create a more peaceful, just and sustainable world.

icbl.org

 

1997 - Appeal of the Nobel Laureates
for the Children of the World



Pierre Marchand, founder of the French humanitarian organization Partage which helps children in places of war, set out on a mission in 1997 to convince all of the Nobel Peace Prize laureates to join together to appeal to the world's governments to make peace and nonviolence for the children of the world a priority. He traveled around the world and secured the participation of all 27 Nobel Peace Prize winners alive at the time. Their appeal stressed the need to help educate young people with tools for peace and nonviolence. Then UNESCO and the Appeal of the Nobel Laureates worked to gather 100 million signatures to present at a special Millennium Assembly in the Year 2000. With UNESCO's support, this initiative helped convince the United Nations to declare the Year 2000 as the International Year for a Culture of Peace, and the first decade of the new Millennium as The International Decade for a Culture of Peace and Nonviolence for the Children of the World. During the Decade, thousands of organizations participated in events and activities to raise awareness about the growing culture of peace movement and the importance of peace and nonviolence education. The Peace Kids story, Peace Kids Pledge tells the story of the Appeal of the Nobel Laureates and offers a Peace Pledge based on the Appeal that young people can use to pledge their support to live more peaceful lives.

 

1998 - "Conscious Evolution"

Barbara Marx Hubbard’s 1998 book, Conscious Evolution: Awakening the Power of Our Social Potential, helped to present the ideas of the conscious evolution movement, which asserts that we now have the ability and the technological, medical, psychological and spiritual tools to consciously choose which direction humanity’s future will take and how we will evolve as a species.  This movement asserts that we have the choice to move forward through cooperation and co-creation or to move toward self-destruction by choosing a path of separation and competition. As humanity consciously evolves, we help guide the evolution of the universe as well.  Other visionaries who write about conscious evolution include: Deepak Chopra, Andrew Cohen, Duane Elgin, Jean Houston, Barbara Marx Hubbard, Ervin LaszloElisabet Sahtouris and Marianne Williamson.

 

May 11-15, 1999 -
Hague Appeal For Peace


As the Second Millennium and history's bloodiest century came to a close, the largest international peace conference ever took place in The Hague, Netherlands from May 11-15, 1999. 10,000 people from over 100 countries gathered for the Hague Appeal for Peace on the 100th Anniversary of the First Hague Peace Conference, to attend over 400 workshops and panels and to discuss how humanity could begin the next millennium working together to abolish war as an option to solve problems within and between nations. At the conference, The Hague Agenda for Peace & Justice, containing 50 steps to creating a more peaceful, just and sustainable world was agreed upon, and The Global Campaign for Peace Education was launched to help teach the necessary tools to create a better world.

HaguePeace.org

 

January 1, 2000
One Day In Peace, JANUARY 1

In the 1990s, a number of individuals and organizations had the idea of beginning the approaching New Millennium with a worldwide day of peace. Just as we are inspired to make resolutions for New Year's each year, they saw this as a unique opportunity for a New Beginning for humanity, a chance to convince the world to CHOOSE the ultimate shared resolution of striving towards peace on earth on this monumental New Year's day. Many of the efforts joined together to synergistically create humanity's very first shared day of peace. One of the efforts was launched with the 1996 picture book, One Day In Peace, January 1, 2000, written by Steve Diamond and Robert Alan Silverstein. The book called for a worldwide day of peace and global ceasefire on January 1, 2000 and was translated into 21 languages. A copy was sent to every world leader and it inspired the formation of the One Day In Peace Network, an association of more than 1000 organizations in 140 countries, which secured a pledge of support from 100 Heads of State; 25 US Governors and hundreds of Mayors around the world declared Proclamations; and the US Congress and the United Nations declared January 1 as a day of peace. After January 1, 2000, the campaign continued under the leadership of Global Family Day, which secured ongoing international support of January 1 as a Global Day of Peace and Sharing.

OneDay.net

 

June 29, 2000 -
The Earth Charter


The Earth Charter is one of the most significant comprehensive blueprints for a better world. It provides a framework for a holistic ethical vision, calling for global partnership to address our interdependent need for environmental protection, human rights, equitable human development and peace.

(more)

 

September, 2000 -
MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOALS


At the Millennium Summit in September 2000 at the United Nations, ALL of the world's leaders agreed "to spare no effort" in working to fulfill the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) by 2015. These shared goals help us take a giant step forward in global cooperation to create a more peaceful, just and sustainable world. Help join the campaign to remind our leaders about their PROMISE.

(more)

 

January 25-30, 2001 -
World Social Forum

The World Social Forum is an annual meeting of activists and civil society organizations that arose out of the anti-globalization movement as a people's alternative to the World Economic Forum. At the first meeting in Brazil in 2001 the shared motto of "Another world is possible" became the uniting banner of hope for activists share proposals and experiences and create alliances to build a more peaceful, just and sustainable world.

WorldSocialForum.org

 

October, 2001 -
"The Better World Handbook"



The Better World Handbook is a comprehensive, in-depth, how-to manual for building a better world. It convincingly illustrates how small every day changes can make a big difference, because all around the world millions of others are also doing things to make the world a better place. The Better World Handbook suggests that a more coordinated 'Better World Movement' is arising as people become more aware of their impact and of the widespread efforts of many others who share their vision of a more peaceful, just and sustainable world.

 

July 1, 2002 -
"The International Criminal Court"


The creation of international laws that protect human rights and the environment is only the first step in creating the parameters for behavior in a more peaceful, just and sustainable world; the other half of the equation is a legal body with the authority to enforce these laws. On July 17, 1998, a historic milestone was reached when 120 nations adopted the Rome Statute, which was the legal basis for creating a permanent International Criminal Court. On July 1, 2002, the Rome Statute came into force after 60 nations had ratified it, and the International Criminal Court was officially established in The Hague in the Netherlands.

icc-cpi.int

 

2005 -
Clinton Global Initiative

In 2005, former US President Bill Clinton founded the Clinton Global Initiative as a nonpartisan organization devoted to bringing together global leaders, corporations and NGOs to address the world's most critical economic, education, energy, environmental, health and women's issues. In addition to the Annual Meeting in September that coincides with the opening of the General Assembly of the United Nations, CGI also hosts an annual conference for college students and an annual event focused on finding solutions to promote economic recovery.

ClintonGlobalInitiative.org

 

July 18, 2007-
The Elders

On his 89th birthday in July 2007, Nelson Mandela announced that Peter Gabriel and billionaire entrepreneur Richard Branson would be providing the funding to launch The Elders, an international non-governmental group of 12 of the world's leading social change advocates who would work together using their "almost 1,000 years of collective experience" to address the world's most challenging peace, human rights, environmental and health issues.

TheElders.org

 

September 17, 2011-
Occupy Wall Street

Over the years there have been numerous protests and emerging movements seeking to expose and address the growing social and economic greed and corruption that drives the global economy, and which has created the greatest divide in income distribution between the wealthiest 1% and everyone else since the Great Depression. Although unemployment has reached epidemic proportions and home foreclosures continue to skyrocket, the media and the mainstream have largely ignored these efforts for change. On September 17, 2011, the Occupy Wall Street movement suddenly captured widespread mainstream attention, and launched a global Occupy movement that sustained media coverage far longer than any movement has in the past. The Occupy movement and it's most powerful slogan, "We are the 99%", continues to be a uniting force and rallying cry for local, national and international efforts for a more fair, just and equitable global economy.

 

2015 -
The People For Bernie Sanders

When Bernie Sanders decided to run for President in the 2016 election, many who wished for a better world were filled with hope. Bernie Sanders' longstanding reputation of fighting for progressive values drew together many diverse grassroots movements to rally around his campaign. They recognized the opportunity to bring mainstream attention to a holistic progressive agenda of social issues. Foremost on the list was tackling economic inequality by getting money out of politics through ending Citizens United and publicly financing elections, breaking up the big banks and reining in Wall Street, providing free higher education and universal health care for all, and guaranteeing a living wage for every worker. Sanders called for curtailing military spending and seeking peaceful solutions to international conflicts; getting serious about global climate change, and a whole host of other issues necessary to create a more peaceful, just and sustainable future. Political groups planned to spend billions of dollars crafting campaign messages leading up to the 2016 election, and many recognized that this could be the next Big Moment for a better world, as the Bernie Sanders campaign promised to keep these crucial issues at the forefront of public attention.

PeopleForBernie.com
#FeelTheBern

 

Peacetopia.com

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May Peace Prevail On Earth


IN SEARCH OF UTOPIA:
100+ Milestones
To Our Utopian Future

paperback
99 cent Kindle edition

MILESTONES

6th Century BC
"Tao Te Ching"

5th Century BC
"Five Classics"

c.380 BC
"Republic"

1215
Magna Carta

1516
"Utopia"

1528
"On Civil Power"

1568
Edict of Torda

1625
"On The Law
of War and Peace"

1648
Peace of Westphalia

1650-1799
Enlightenment

1689
"Two Treatises of Government"

1762
"Social Contract"

July 4, 1776
US Declaration of Independence

September 17, 1787
US Constitution

August 26, 1789
Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen

September 25, 1789
US Bill of Rights

1793
Department of Peace

1795
"Perpetual Peace"

1814
On The Reorganization of European Society

1815
Peace Societies

April 27, 1825
New Harmony

1836
New Moral World

1843
International
Peace Congress

1849
"Civil Disobedience"

February 1, 1865
13th Amendment
Abolishing Slavery

1879
"Progress and Poverty"

May 18, 1899
Hague Peace Conference

1901
Nobel Peace Prize

1906-1914
Satyagraha

January 8, 1918
14 Points

June 28, 1919
League of Nations

1920
19th Amendment:
Women's Right
to Vote

1933
The New Deal

April 15, 1935
Pax Cultura -
The Roerich Pact

August 14, 1935
Social Security Act

1938
Fair Labor
Standards Act

January 6, 1941
The Four Freedoms

October 24, 1945
The United Nations

August, 1947
World Federalist Movement

December 10, 1948
Universal Declaration of Human Rights

1955
"Let There Be
Peace On Earth"

1955
May Peace
Prevail On Earth"

July 9, 1955
Russell-Einstein
Manifesto

1956
The Beloved Community

1960-1963
The New Frontier

March 1, 1961
Peace Corps

August 28, 1963
"I Have a Dream"

1963-1969
The Great Society

July 2, 1964
Civil Rights Act
of 1964

1966
Grape Boycott

1968
"Operating Manual
for Spaceship Earth"

1970
Earth Day

October 11, 1971
"Imagine"

1981
International Day of Peace

1981
Ashoka: Innovators for the Public

1982
Newman's Own

1985
77 Theses on the Care of the Earth

1988
Global Cooperation for a Better World

1991
Earth Constitution

June, 1992
The Earth Summit

1992
UNESCO
Culture of Peace Programme

1992
"4000 Ideas & Dreams for a Better World"

1995
Earth Magna Charta

1995
"When Corporations Rule The World"

1996
"Peace On Earth Millennium"

Sep. 18, 1997
Mine Ban Treaty

1997
Appeal of the Nobel Laureates

1998
"Conscious Evolution"

May 11-15, 1999
Hague Appeal for Peace

January 1, 2000
One Day In Peace

June 29, 2000
The Earth Charter

September, 2000
Millennium Development Goals

January 25-30, 2001
World Social Forum

October, 2001
"Better World Handbook"

July 1 , 2002
International
Criminal Court

2005
Clinton Global Initiative

July 18, 2007
The Elders

September 17, 2011
Occupy Wall Street

2015
The People For
Bernie Sanders

MILESTONES

6th Century BC
"Tao Te Ching"

5th Century BC
"Five Classics"

c.380 BC
"Republic"

1215
Magna Carta

1516
"Utopia"

1528
"On Civil Power"

1568
Edict of Torda

1625
"On The Law
of War and Peace"

1648
Peace of Westphalia

1650-1799
Enlightenment

1689
"Two Treatises of Government"

1762
"Social Contract"

July 4, 1776
US Declaration of Independence

September 17, 1787
US Constitution

August 26, 1789
Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen

September 25, 1789
US Bill of Rights

1793
Department of Peace

1795
"Perpetual Peace"

1814
On The Reorganization of European Society

1815
Peace Societies

April 27, 1825
New Harmony

1836
New Moral World

1843
International
Peace Congress

1849
"Civil Disobedience"

February 1, 1865
13th Amendment
Abolishing Slavery

1879
"Progress and Poverty"

May 18, 1899
Hague Peace Conference

1901
Nobel Peace Prize

1906-1914
Satyagraha

January 8, 1918
14 Points

June 28, 1919
League of Nations

1920
19th Amendment:
Women's Right
to Vote

1933
The New Deal

April 15, 1935
Pax Cultura -
The Roerich Pact

August 14, 1935
Social Security Act

1938
Fair Labor
Standards Act

January 6, 1941
The Four Freedoms

October 24, 1945
The United Nations

August, 1947
World Federalist Movement

December 10, 1948
Universal Declaration of Human Rights

1955
"Let There Be
Peace On Earth"

1955
May Peace
Prevail On Earth"

July 9, 1955
Russell-Einstein
Manifesto

1956
The Beloved Community

1960-1963
The New Frontier

March 1, 1961
Peace Corps

August 28, 1963
"I Have a Dream"

1963-1969
The Great Society

July 2, 1964
Civil Rights Act
of 1964

1966
Grape Boycott

1968
"Operating Manual
for Spaceship Earth"

1970
Earth Day

October 11, 1971
"Imagine"

1981
International Day of Peace

1981
Ashoka: Innovators for the Public

1982
Newman's Own

1985
77 Theses on the Care of the Earth

1988
Global Cooperation for a Better World

1991
Earth Constitution

June, 1992
The Earth Summit

1992
UNESCO
Culture of Peace Programme

1992
"4000 Ideas & Dreams for a Better World"

1995
Earth Magna Charta

1995
"When Corporations Rule The World"

1996
"Peace On Earth Millennium"

Sep. 18, 1997
Mine Ban Treaty

1997
Appeal of the Nobel Laureates

1998
"Conscious Evolution"

May 11-15, 1999
Hague Appeal for Peace

January 1, 2000
One Day In Peace

June 29, 2000
The Earth Charter

September, 2000
Millennium Development Goals

January 25-30, 2001
World Social Forum

October, 2001
"Better World Handbook"

July 1 , 2002
International
Criminal Court

2005
Clinton Global Initiative

July 18, 2007
The Elders

September 17, 2011
Occupy Wall Street

2015
The People For
Bernie Sanders

MILESTONES

6th Century BC
"Tao Te Ching"

5th Century BC
"Five Classics"

c.380 BC
"Republic"

1215
Magna Carta

1516
"Utopia"

1528
"On Civil Power"

1568
Edict of Torda

1625
"On The Law
of War and Peace"

1648
Peace of Westphalia

1650-1799
Enlightenment

1689
"Two Treatises of Government"

1762
"Social Contract"

July 4, 1776
US Declaration of Independence

September 17, 1787
US Constitution

August 26, 1789
Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen

September 25, 1789
US Bill of Rights

1793
Department of Peace

1795
"Perpetual Peace"

1814
On The Reorganization of European Society

1815
Peace Societies

April 27, 1825
New Harmony

1836
New Moral World

1843
International
Peace Congress

1849
"Civil Disobedience"

February 1, 1865
13th Amendment
Abolishing Slavery

1879
"Progress and Poverty"

May 18, 1899
Hague Peace Conference

1901
Nobel Peace Prize

1906-1914
Satyagraha

January 8, 1918
14 Points

June 28, 1919
League of Nations

1920
19th Amendment:
Women's Right
to Vote

1933
The New Deal

April 15, 1935
Pax Cultura -
The Roerich Pact

August 14, 1935
Social Security Act

1938
Fair Labor
Standards Act

January 6, 1941
The Four Freedoms

October 24, 1945
The United Nations

August, 1947
World Federalist Movement

December 10, 1948
Universal Declaration of Human Rights

1955
"Let There Be
Peace On Earth"

1955
May Peace
Prevail On Earth"

July 9, 1955
Russell-Einstein
Manifesto

1956
The Beloved Community

1960-1963
The New Frontier

March 1, 1961
Peace Corps

August 28, 1963
"I Have a Dream"

1963-1969
The Great Society

July 2, 1964
Civil Rights Act
of 1964

1966
Grape Boycott

1968
"Operating Manual
for Spaceship Earth"

1970
Earth Day

October 11, 1971
"Imagine"

1981
International Day of Peace

1981
Ashoka: Innovators for the Public

1982
Newman's Own

1985
77 Theses on the Care of the Earth

1988
Global Cooperation for a Better World

1991
Earth Constitution

June, 1992
The Earth Summit

1992
UNESCO
Culture of Peace Programme

1992
"4000 Ideas & Dreams for a Better World"

1995
Earth Magna Charta

1995
"When Corporations Rule The World"

1996
"Peace On Earth Millennium"

Sep. 18, 1997
Mine Ban Treaty

1997
Appeal of the Nobel Laureates

1998
"Conscious Evolution"

May 11-15, 1999
Hague Appeal for Peace

January 1, 2000
One Day In Peace

June 29, 2000
The Earth Charter

September, 2000
Millennium Development Goals

January 25-30, 2001
World Social Forum

October, 2001
"Better World Handbook"

July 1 , 2002
International
Criminal Court

2005
Clinton Global Initiative

July 18, 2007
The Elders

September 17, 2011
Occupy Wall Street

2015
The People For
Bernie Sanders

MILESTONES

6th Century BC
"Tao Te Ching"

5th Century BC
"Five Classics"

c.380 BC
"Republic"

1215
Magna Carta

1516
"Utopia"

1528
"On Civil Power"

1568
Edict of Torda

1625
"On The Law
of War and Peace"

1648
Peace of Westphalia

1650-1799
Enlightenment

1689
"Two Treatises of Government"

1762
"Social Contract"

July 4, 1776
US Declaration of Independence

September 17, 1787
US Constitution

August 26, 1789
Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen

September 25, 1789
US Bill of Rights

1793
Department of Peace

1795
"Perpetual Peace"

1814
On The Reorganization of European Society

1815
Peace Societies

April 27, 1825
New Harmony

1836
New Moral World

1843
International
Peace Congress

1849
"Civil Disobedience"

February 1, 1865
13th Amendment
Abolishing Slavery

1879
"Progress and Poverty"

May 18, 1899
Hague Peace Conference

1901
Nobel Peace Prize

1906-1914
Satyagraha

January 8, 1918
14 Points

June 28, 1919
League of Nations

1920
19th Amendment:
Women's Right
to Vote

1933
The New Deal

April 15, 1935
Pax Cultura -
The Roerich Pact

August 14, 1935
Social Security Act

1938
Fair Labor
Standards Act

January 6, 1941
The Four Freedoms

October 24, 1945
The United Nations

August, 1947
World Federalist Movement

December 10, 1948
Universal Declaration of Human Rights

1955
"Let There Be
Peace On Earth"

1955
May Peace
Prevail On Earth"

July 9, 1955
Russell-Einstein
Manifesto

1956
The Beloved Community

1960-1963
The New Frontier

March 1, 1961
Peace Corps

August 28, 1963
"I Have a Dream"

1963-1969
The Great Society

July 2, 1964
Civil Rights Act
of 1964

1966
Grape Boycott

1968
"Operating Manual
for Spaceship Earth"

1970
Earth Day

October 11, 1971
"Imagine"

1981
International Day of Peace

1981
Ashoka: Innovators for the Public

1982
Newman's Own

1985
77 Theses on the Care of the Earth

1988
Global Cooperation for a Better World

1991
Earth Constitution

June, 1992
The Earth Summit

1992
UNESCO
Culture of Peace Programme

1992
"4000 Ideas & Dreams for a Better World"

1995
Earth Magna Charta

1995
"When Corporations Rule The World"

1996
"Peace On Earth Millennium"

Sep. 18, 1997
Mine Ban Treaty

1997
Appeal of the Nobel Laureates

1998
"Conscious Evolution"

May 11-15, 1999
Hague Appeal for Peace

January 1, 2000
One Day In Peace

June 29, 2000
The Earth Charter

September, 2000
Millennium Development Goals

January 25-30, 2001
World Social Forum

October, 2001
"Better World Handbook"

July 1 , 2002
International
Criminal Court

2005
Clinton Global Initiative

July 18, 2007
The Elders

September 17, 2011
Occupy Wall Street

2015
The People For
Bernie Sanders

MILESTONES

6th Century BC
"Tao Te Ching"

5th Century BC
"Five Classics"

c.380 BC
"Republic"

1215
Magna Carta

1516
"Utopia"

1528
"On Civil Power"

1568
Edict of Torda

1625
"On The Law
of War and Peace"

1648
Peace of Westphalia

1650-1799
Enlightenment

1689
"Two Treatises of Government"

1762
"Social Contract"

July 4, 1776
US Declaration of Independence

September 17, 1787
US Constitution

August 26, 1789
Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen

September 25, 1789
US Bill of Rights

1793
Department of Peace

1795
"Perpetual Peace"

1814
On The Reorganization of European Society

1815
Peace Societies

April 27, 1825
New Harmony

1836
New Moral World

1843
International
Peace Congress

1849
"Civil Disobedience"

February 1, 1865
13th Amendment
Abolishing Slavery

1879
"Progress and Poverty"

May 18, 1899
Hague Peace Conference

1901
Nobel Peace Prize

1906-1914
Satyagraha

January 8, 1918
14 Points

June 28, 1919
League of Nations

1920
19th Amendment:
Women's Right
to Vote

1933
The New Deal

April 15, 1935
Pax Cultura -
The Roerich Pact

August 14, 1935
Social Security Act

1938
Fair Labor
Standards Act

January 6, 1941
The Four Freedoms

October 24, 1945
The United Nations

August, 1947
World Federalist Movement

December 10, 1948
Universal Declaration of Human Rights

1955
"Let There Be
Peace On Earth"

1955
May Peace
Prevail On Earth"

July 9, 1955
Russell-Einstein
Manifesto

1956
The Beloved Community

1960-1963
The New Frontier

March 1, 1961
Peace Corps

August 28, 1963
"I Have a Dream"

1963-1969
The Great Society

July 2, 1964
Civil Rights Act
of 1964

1966
Grape Boycott

1968
"Operating Manual
for Spaceship Earth"

1970
Earth Day

October 11, 1971
"Imagine"

1981
International Day of Peace

1981
Ashoka: Innovators for the Public

1982
Newman's Own

1985
77 Theses on the Care of the Earth

1988
Global Cooperation for a Better World

1991
Earth Constitution

June, 1992
The Earth Summit

1992
UNESCO
Culture of Peace Programme

1992
"4000 Ideas & Dreams for a Better World"

1995
Earth Magna Charta

1995
"When Corporations Rule The World"

1996
"Peace On Earth Millennium"

Sep. 18, 1997
Mine Ban Treaty

1997
Appeal of the Nobel Laureates

1998
"Conscious Evolution"

May 11-15, 1999
Hague Appeal for Peace

January 1, 2000
One Day In Peace

June 29, 2000
The Earth Charter

September, 2000
Millennium Development Goals

January 25-30, 2001
World Social Forum

October, 2001
"Better World Handbook"

July 1 , 2002
International
Criminal Court

2005
Clinton Global Initiative

July 18, 2007
The Elders

September 17, 2011
Occupy Wall Street

2015
The People For
Bernie Sanders

MILESTONES

6th Century BC
"Tao Te Ching"

5th Century BC
"Five Classics"

c.380 BC
"Republic"

1215
Magna Carta

1516
"Utopia"

1528
"On Civil Power"

1568
Edict of Torda

1625
"On The Law
of War and Peace"

1648
Peace of Westphalia

1650-1799
Enlightenment

1689
"Two Treatises of Government"

1762
"Social Contract"

July 4, 1776
US Declaration of Independence

September 17, 1787
US Constitution

August 26, 1789
Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen

September 25, 1789
US Bill of Rights

1793
Department of Peace

1795
"Perpetual Peace"

1814
On The Reorganization of European Society

1815
Peace Societies

April 27, 1825
New Harmony

1836
New Moral World

1843
International
Peace Congress

1849
"Civil Disobedience"

February 1, 1865
13th Amendment
Abolishing Slavery

1879
"Progress and Poverty"

May 18, 1899
Hague Peace Conference

1901
Nobel Peace Prize

1906-1914
Satyagraha

January 8, 1918
14 Points

June 28, 1919
League of Nations

1920
19th Amendment:
Women's Right
to Vote

1933
The New Deal

April 15, 1935
Pax Cultura -
The Roerich Pact

August 14, 1935
Social Security Act

1938
Fair Labor
Standards Act

January 6, 1941
The Four Freedoms

October 24, 1945
The United Nations

August, 1947
World Federalist Movement

December 10, 1948
Universal Declaration of Human Rights

1955
"Let There Be
Peace On Earth"

1955
May Peace
Prevail On Earth"

July 9, 1955
Russell-Einstein
Manifesto

1956
The Beloved Community

1960-1963
The New Frontier

March 1, 1961
Peace Corps

August 28, 1963
"I Have a Dream"

1963-1969
The Great Society

July 2, 1964
Civil Rights Act
of 1964

1966
Grape Boycott

1968
"Operating Manual
for Spaceship Earth"

1970
Earth Day

October 11, 1971
"Imagine"

1981
International Day of Peace

1981
Ashoka: Innovators for the Public

1982
Newman's Own

1985
77 Theses on the Care of the Earth

1988
Global Cooperation for a Better World

1991
Earth Constitution

June, 1992
The Earth Summit

1992
UNESCO
Culture of Peace Programme

1992
"4000 Ideas & Dreams for a Better World"

1995
Earth Magna Charta

1995
"When Corporations Rule The World"

1996
"Peace On Earth Millennium"

Sep. 18, 1997
Mine Ban Treaty

1997
Appeal of the Nobel Laureates

1998
"Conscious Evolution"

May 11-15, 1999
Hague Appeal for Peace

January 1, 2000
One Day In Peace

June 29, 2000
The Earth Charter

September, 2000
Millennium Development Goals

January 25-30, 2001
World Social Forum

October, 2001
"Better World Handbook"

July 1 , 2002
International
Criminal Court

2005
Clinton Global Initiative

July 18, 2007
The Elders

September 17, 2011
Occupy Wall Street

2015
The People For
Bernie Sanders

MILESTONES

6th Century BC
"Tao Te Ching"

5th Century BC
"Five Classics"

c.380 BC
"Republic"

1215
Magna Carta

1516
"Utopia"

1528
"On Civil Power"

1568
Edict of Torda

1625
"On The Law
of War and Peace"

1648
Peace of Westphalia

1650-1799
Enlightenment

1689
"Two Treatises of Government"

1762
"Social Contract"

July 4, 1776
US Declaration of Independence

September 17, 1787
US Constitution

August 26, 1789
Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen

September 25, 1789
US Bill of Rights

1793
Department of Peace

1795
"Perpetual Peace"

1814
On The Reorganization of European Society

1815
Peace Societies

April 27, 1825
New Harmony

1836
New Moral World

1843
International
Peace Congress

1849
"Civil Disobedience"

February 1, 1865
13th Amendment
Abolishing Slavery

1879
"Progress and Poverty"

May 18, 1899
Hague Peace Conference

1901
Nobel Peace Prize

1906-1914
Satyagraha

January 8, 1918
14 Points

June 28, 1919
League of Nations

1920
19th Amendment:
Women's Right
to Vote

1933
The New Deal

April 15, 1935
Pax Cultura -
The Roerich Pact

August 14, 1935
Social Security Act

1938
Fair Labor
Standards Act

January 6, 1941
The Four Freedoms

October 24, 1945
The United Nations

August, 1947
World Federalist Movement

December 10, 1948
Universal Declaration of Human Rights

1955
"Let There Be
Peace On Earth"

1955
May Peace
Prevail On Earth"

July 9, 1955
Russell-Einstein
Manifesto

1956
The Beloved Community

1960-1963
The New Frontier

March 1, 1961
Peace Corps

August 28, 1963
"I Have a Dream"

1963-1969
The Great Society

July 2, 1964
Civil Rights Act
of 1964

1966
Grape Boycott

1968
"Operating Manual
for Spaceship Earth"

1970
Earth Day

October 11, 1971
"Imagine"

1981
International Day of Peace

1981
Ashoka: Innovators for the Public

1982
Newman's Own

1985
77 Theses on the Care of the Earth

1988
Global Cooperation for a Better World

1991
Earth Constitution

June, 1992
The Earth Summit

1992
UNESCO
Culture of Peace Programme

1992
"4000 Ideas & Dreams for a Better World"

1995
Earth Magna Charta

1995
"When Corporations Rule The World"

1996
"Peace On Earth Millennium"

Sep. 18, 1997
Mine Ban Treaty

1997
Appeal of the Nobel Laureates

1998
"Conscious Evolution"

May 11-15, 1999
Hague Appeal for Peace

January 1, 2000
One Day In Peace

June 29, 2000
The Earth Charter

September, 2000
Millennium Development Goals

January 25-30, 2001
World Social Forum

October, 2001
"Better World Handbook"

July 1 , 2002
International
Criminal Court

2005
Clinton Global Initiative

July 18, 2007
The Elders

September 17, 2011
Occupy Wall Street

2015
The People For
Bernie Sanders

MILESTONES

6th Century BC
"Tao Te Ching"

5th Century BC
"Five Classics"

c.380 BC
"Republic"

1215
Magna Carta

1516
"Utopia"

1528
"On Civil Power"

1568
Edict of Torda

1625
"On The Law
of War and Peace"

1648
Peace of Westphalia

1650-1799
Enlightenment

1689
"Two Treatises of Government"

1762
"Social Contract"

July 4, 1776
US Declaration of Independence

September 17, 1787
US Constitution

August 26, 1789
Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen

September 25, 1789
US Bill of Rights

1793
Department of Peace

1795
"Perpetual Peace"

1814
On The Reorganization of European Society

1815
Peace Societies

April 27, 1825
New Harmony

1836
New Moral World

1843
International
Peace Congress

1849
"Civil Disobedience"

February 1, 1865
13th Amendment
Abolishing Slavery

1879
"Progress and Poverty"

May 18, 1899
Hague Peace Conference

1901
Nobel Peace Prize

1906-1914
Satyagraha

January 8, 1918
14 Points

June 28, 1919
League of Nations

1920
19th Amendment:
Women's Right
to Vote

1933
The New Deal

April 15, 1935
Pax Cultura -
The Roerich Pact

August 14, 1935
Social Security Act

1938
Fair Labor
Standards Act

January 6, 1941
The Four Freedoms

October 24, 1945
The United Nations

August, 1947
World Federalist Movement

December 10, 1948
Universal Declaration of Human Rights

1955
"Let There Be
Peace On Earth"

1955
May Peace
Prevail On Earth"

July 9, 1955
Russell-Einstein
Manifesto

1956
The Beloved Community

1960-1963
The New Frontier

March 1, 1961
Peace Corps

August 28, 1963
"I Have a Dream"

1963-1969
The Great Society

July 2, 1964
Civil Rights Act
of 1964

1966
Grape Boycott

1968
"Operating Manual
for Spaceship Earth"

1970
Earth Day

October 11, 1971
"Imagine"

1981
International Day of Peace

1981
Ashoka: Innovators for the Public

1982
Newman's Own

1985
77 Theses on the Care of the Earth

1988
Global Cooperation for a Better World

1991
Earth Constitution

June, 1992
The Earth Summit

1992
UNESCO
Culture of Peace Programme

1992
"4000 Ideas & Dreams for a Better World"

1995
Earth Magna Charta

1995
"When Corporations Rule The World"

1996
"Peace On Earth Millennium"

Sep. 18, 1997
Mine Ban Treaty

1997
Appeal of the Nobel Laureates

1998
"Conscious Evolution"

May 11-15, 1999
Hague Appeal for Peace

January 1, 2000
One Day In Peace

June 29, 2000
The Earth Charter

September, 2000
Millennium Development Goals

January 25-30, 2001
World Social Forum

October, 2001
"Better World Handbook"

July 1 , 2002
International
Criminal Court

2005
Clinton Global Initiative

July 18, 2007
The Elders

September 17, 2011
Occupy Wall Street

2015
The People For
Bernie Sanders